New lyricists looking at fresh needs and demands

By The IST News Network

It was an informative interaction between media and poets at The Ginger restaurant on 28th October, 2017 in Harris Park, NSW. The most vocal among the poets was the knowledgeable Imran Pratapgarhi, a post-graduate in Hindi from Allahabad University. He said he never studied Urdu as a subject but learned it in the family. Though he joined the media conference a bit later but his command over the language was palpable. The media conference and the Mushaira was hard labour of M. Shamim Khan, himself a poet

Another poet Rahat Indori sprinkled a few of his nazms in between the conference that were more contemporary and political. Others at the conference were AM Turaz, Popular Meerathi. At the outset the poets were asked why we don’t get to hear lyrics like we used to hear in our time, Turaz replied that time is changing now and we are working on good and meaningful lyrics. He, being lyricist of several Bollywood films like Bajirao Mastani, said interest in good lyrics is on the rise and people are moving away from rap songs.

To another question that a famous director and producer in an interview said that our songs carry the story forward and not just a song for the sake of songs, why there are no such songs? Turaz said our lyrics go with the story

Another question was put to Imran that most lyricists of the past lyricists like Sahir, Majrooh, Kaifi, Khawaja Ahmed Abbas and Shailendra were revolutionaries and their songs reflected Indian culture like the in song “ Mehman jo hamara hota hai, who jaan se pyaara hota hai,” what we get to listen is “munni badnam hui or Sheila ki jawani,” why we don’t have such lyricists? Imran said that our songs are situation based and we try and give clean lyrics and we don’t work for money but quality. He said a new song ‘Ghoomer’ in Padmawati is already making waves and depicts Rajasthani culture. The new breed of lyricists are aware to the needs and demand to bring about the change

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Ashok Kumar

Ashok Kumar is an accomplished journalist with over 38 years of experience in the profession in various capacities. He was a sub-editor in Patriot and later Chief Sub-editor in The Hindustan Times, New Delhi. He has several published articles and reports in Patriot and HT. Published reports in The Blacktown Sun in Sydney. He had also been a tutor in journalism in the University of Western Sydney. He is currently Editor at The
Indian Sub-continent Times, Sydney.

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